LSAT Preparation Classes

  • 1-on-1 personal coaching
  • Get undivided attention from LSAT experts
  • Decide on what you’d like to cover in each session
  • Determine the duration & frequency of your sessions

About the Individual Course

You have complete autonomy over how your sessions are structured. If you’re looking for flexibility without compromising your LSAT performance, this individual course will allow you to build your fully personalised study plan with your designated LSAT trainers. These individual sessions will help you to…

  • Build a solid foundation & understanding of the LSAT curriculum
  • Improve your weak areas
  • Work on the application of concepts learnt
  • Answer difficult questions
  • Improve on your time management skills

About the LSAT

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is a half-day, standardized test that takes place a few times each year at designated testing centers throughout the world. The LSAT test consists of five 35-minute sections of multiple-choice questions. Four of the five sections contribute to the test taker’s score.

The sections are Reading Comprehension section, Analytical Reasoning section, and two Logical Reasoning sections. The unscored section is usually used to pretest new test questions or forms. Identification of the unscored section is not available until you receive your score report.

In addition, you will expect a 35-minute, unscored writing sample at the end of the test. Copies of your writing sample will be sent to all the law schools that you apply.

Reading Comprehension

These questions measure your ability to read, with understanding and insight, examples of lengthy and complex materials similar to those commonly found in law school curriculum. This section contains four sets of reading questions. Each set has a selection of reading materials, followed by five to eight questions to test reading and reasoning abilities.

Analytical Reasoning

These questions measure your ability to understand a structure of relationships and to draw logical conclusions about that structure. You are asked to make deductions from a set of statements, rules, or conditions that describe relationships among entities such as persons, places, things, or events. They simulate the kinds of detailed analyses of relationships that a law student must perform in solving legal problems.

Logical Reasoning

These questions are designed to evaluate your ability to understand, analyze, criticize, and complete a variety of arguments. Each logical reasoning question requires you to read and comprehend a short passage, then answer a question about it. The questions test a variety of abilities involved in reasoning logically and thinking critically.

LSAT Score Guide

Your Raw Score

While the number of questions in each test varies slightly, you can expect to see anything from 99-102 multiple-choice questions. Your LSAT score is based on the number of questions answered correctly; this is your “raw score”. Each question is granted the same weightage, and you will not be penalised for any incorrect answers. To allow for a fairer consideration of your scores, your raw score will be converted to a scaled score ranging from 120-180. An average LSAT test taker will achieve a scale score of 150.

The Scaled Score

The scaled score deviates from a traditional bell curve as the scale is set before students sit for the test. Scaling benefits test-takers as it helps to account for the discrepancies and variances between different papers. For example, on a more challenging test, you might be allowed 11 incorrect answers and still achieve a scaled score of 170. Conversely, on an easier test, you would only be allowed 9 incorrect answers for the same scaled score.

Your Percentile Ranking

In addition, you will also receive your percentile ranking. This depicts your performance in relation to every test taker from the previous three testing years. The higher your percentile ranking, the better your comparative performance.

What is the Score Band?

The final component included in the score report is your score band. Since LSAT scores are only estimates of your actual ability in the skills tested, your true proficiency may be slightly higher or slightly lower than that reflected by your official LSAT score. The score band includes a range of scores slightly higher and lower than the score received, within which your actual skill ability is found. For the LSAT, your score band is roughly 3 points above and 3 points below your scaled score with a 68% level of confidence. Should you sit for the test multiple times, your score band is recalculated based on previous performances, creating a typically narrower band.

The Score Preview – First-time Test Takers Only

The LSAT now offers a score preview exclusively for first-time test takers. For a nominal fee, first-time test takers can decide to cancel or keep their test scores, but they must make their decision within the first 6 calendar days upon receiving their results. This practice was introduced to curb test anxiety for new test-takers, which is why score preview is only applicable for your first try.

Score Auditing
Should you wish, you can also request a score audit after receiving your LSAT scores. Do note that you will be charged for this, and the process can take up to several weeks to be completed. However, the initial test response data is reviewed before official results are released, so score audits rarely result in a score change.

Our LSAT Prep Courses

Get Started With Us Today

Find out how much you need to prepare for the LSAT. Fill in the form below or call us at +912226139491 and our course consultants will be in touch to provide you more details to help you start with your LSAT preparations!

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